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TruMedia Networks is a software engineering firm focused on powering sports analytics platforms.

In the News

News about TruMedia and articles featuring TruMedia data and analysis.

Filtering by Tag: mlb

Vlad Jr.'s early stats are promising

Rafe Anderson

Among the first impressions that ESPN’s Bradford Doolittle has about Vladimir Guerrero, Jr.:

“Guerrero's advanced approach also shows up in his ability to spoil pitches by fouling them off, something that was evident a couple of times over the weekend. As a 20-year-old, he's fouled off 37.1 percent of the pitches he's swung at so far, according to TruMedia, which is a tick below the big league average. The same holds true for his ability to foul off two-strike offerings.”

Full article: ESPN.com

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Are .300 hitters a thing of the past?

Rafe Anderson

ESPN’s Bradford Doolittle wonders if .300 hitters are a thing of the past, exploring increased pitcher velocity and advancements in hitting analysis.

“The frequency with which Pujols now faces high-power velocity hasn't done him any favors, either. Remember that figure of 196 homers he has hit with the Angels? According to TruMedia, only four of them have come against the 1,050 pitches he has seen that have registered at 96 mph or greater. “

Full article: ESPN.com

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What to Expect from Marwin Gonzalez

Rafe Anderson

Twins Daily, part of ESPN’s SweetSpot Network, uses TruMedia’s site to explore what to expect from Minnesota signing Marwin Gonzalez this season:

“Per ESPN/TruMedia’s data, in 2017, Gonzalez had a .794 batting average on line drives as a lefty. Coincidentally, only Logan Morrison (.805) had a better average. The rest of the league’s left-handed constituency sat at .687. So Gonzalez was performing well above the norm which may have been an indication to expect regression. Last year that number dropped to .613. Part of the reason for this is that his line drives carried a bit further than his previous season. In 2017 his average liner went 257 feet on average but was at 268 feet in 2018, meaning fewer liners dropped in front of the outfielders and infielders. Hitting the ball hard on a line is obviously preferential, however there are some diminishing returns when more liners become midrange instead of short or long.”

Full article: Twins Daily

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RED SOX LAUNCH WALLY'S MATH ACADEMY

Rafe Anderson

The Boston Red Sox have launched Wally’s Math Academy, a program that engages elementary and middle-school students by combining their passion for baseball with the math skills they are learning in school. Developed by TruMedia Networks, this powerful application allows educators to quickly generate classroom exercises and take-home worksheets that feature real-time sports content.

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Forsythe Doesn't Chase Breaking Balls

Rafe Anderson

Twins Daily, part of ESPN's blog network, uses TruMedia's product to analyze Logan Forsythe's approach...

"Forsythe rarely chases breaking balls out of the zone. According to ESPN/TruMedia’s data, since 2017 he’s reached on just 14.3 percent of breaking balls outside of the zone whereas the average hitter has done so on just over 30 percent. For comparison’s sake, Joe Mauer has even chased after 23 percent of breaking balls in that time. Forsythe will swing through some (8 percent, same as Mauer) and the results aren’t great when he does make contact (a .588 OPS vs .657 MLB average) but with baseball’s increasing reliance on nasty breaking balls, being able to wait back and keep from chasing after those pitches is rare skill set."

Full article: Twins Daily

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Circumstantial evidence for Jose Urena not great

Rafe Anderson

ESPN.com's Bradford Doolittle writes that the circumstantial evidence for Jose Urena's innocence is not great, regarding his beaning of Ronald Acuna:

"Urena's 25 hit batters since last season are tied for the most in the majors with Cole Hamels and Charlie Morton. According to TruMedia research, his 17 hit batsmen since 2016 on fastballs are tied for the most in baseball."

Full article: ESPN.com

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Juan Soto's Historic Year

Rafe Anderson

Neil Greenberg uses TruMedia data and heat maps to show how good teenager Juan Soto has been this season:

"When Soto isn’t taking a free pass to first, he’s crushing balls: Soto is batting .367 with a 1.215 OPS against four-seam fastballs, sinkers and cutters, the highest OPS among batters who have seen at least 650 fastballs in 2018, per data from TruMedia. It doesn’t matter if the pitch is inside, outside, high or low — Soto finds a way to muscle it out of the park."

Full article: Washington Post

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Trout's pitches with runners on

Rafe Anderson

For ESPN.com, Bradford Doolittle looks at Mike Trout's low RBI total and whether or not the pitches he sees are a factor...

"According to TruMedia, since the beginning of the 2016 season, 46.7 percent of the pitches Trout has seen with runners on base have been in the strike zone. That's lower than the league average (47.6 percent) but not shockingly low. There have been 103 hitters to see an even lower frequency of strikes in those spots."

Full article: ESPN.com

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Ramos' framing helps Phillies

Rafe Anderson

For the Washington Post's Fancy Stats blog, Neil Greenberg used TruMedia's heat maps to show the extra strike calls that Wilson Ramos' framing provides:

"Ramos also gives the Phillies another catcher who can frame pitches. With Knapp behind the plate, Philadelphia’s pitchers get a called strike on pitches out of the zone 5.4 percent of the time, per TruMedia; Ramos has a 7.2 percent called-strike rate on those pitches, just slightly lower than Alfaro (7.8 percent). The league average is 7.2 percent."

Full article: Washington Post

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J.D. Martinez’s defense? What the numbers really say

Rafe Anderson

TruMedia CTO Jeff Stern discusses defensive metrics with the Boston Red Sox' J.D. Martinez and The Boston Globe.

“The 40-minute conversation between Martinez and Stern was illuminating in trying to assess Martinez’s defense on an individual level and in understanding the evolution of modern defensive statistics — and whether those numbers seen by the public are the same as those used by teams or analysts such as the TruMedia team.”

Full article: The Boston Globe

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Could data save the bunt?

Rafe Anderson

The Washington Post's Neil Greenberg wonders if the time has come to bring back the bunt. 

"According to data from TruMedia, there were 232 bunt singles last year from March to June, the lowest since 2008, the first year data is available. This season there were 226.

But it might be time to bring the bunt back, especially with more and more teams employing the shift to neutralize the league's most-predictable hitters."

Full article: ChicagoTribune.com (via Washington Post)

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Scherzer uses TruMedia as part of exhaustive prep

Rafe Anderson

Three-time Cy Young winner Max Scherzer relies on TruMedia's baseball analytics platform as part of his exhaustive preparation process.

"...instead of watching film of opposing hitters like pitchers tend to do, [Scherzer] pulled up an analytically driven website called TruMedia. He proceeded to pore over a series of numbers and heat maps, comparing the 2018 version of himself to the 2017 version who won a second straight Cy Young award."

Full article: ESPN.com

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Trout's season compares to Babe Ruth

Rafe Anderson

The Washington Post's Neil Greenberg uses TruMedia's baseball platform as he says Mike Trout's season is comparable to Ruth, Mays, Williams and Mantle.

"Trout has always been productive at the plate — his career OPS heading into this season was .976 — but improved plate discipline has helped him find another level of efficiency. He is chasing a career-low 18 percent of pitches out of the strike zone while making contact on a career-high 90 percent of pitches in the strike zone. ...

Trout mashes off-speed pitches, too. According to data from TruMedia, he is hitting .414 with a 1.554 OPS against change-ups and splitters with five of his 23 home runs coming off those offerings. Curveballs have been an issue in terms of power, but that, too, is relative. His .600 slugging percentage against that pitch is strong despite having just one home run against curves this year."

Full article: Washington Post

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Scherzer is MLB's best pitcher

Rafe Anderson

The Washington Post's Neil Greenberg uses TruMedia's baseball platform to support his claim that Max Scherzer is the best pitcher in baseball.

"According to data from TruMedia, Scherzer averages 92.7 mph with his fastball and, when he throws it in the upper third of the plate, opposing batters swing and miss a career-high 39 percent of the time. Overall, hitters are putting the pitch in play less than a quarter of the time it is thrown (24 percent), making it difficult for batters to get good wood on the ball.

His slider, used almost exclusively against right-handed batters, is thrown in the strike zone 57 percent of the time yet is a called strike half the time. In other words, the pitch is completely baffling hitters."

Full article: Washington Post

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Is Scott Kingery snapping out of it?

Rafe Anderson

Phillies prospect Scott Kingery may be snapping out of his slump, as SB Nation blog The Good Phight explains, using TruMedia imagery…

“First, let’s set the baseline. For the first three weeks in May, Kingery continued to struggle to put a good bat on the ball. Just look at the spray chart.

There is exactly ONE ball that made it into left field for three weeks, and that came on May 19 against St. Louis, near the tail end of that stretch. Every single other ball on the left side of the infield was a grounder, save for one pop-up just to the left of second base. There was just no good contact whatsoever.

In the last six games, however, Kingery has already had five line drives off the bat; one more than he had in the previous three weeks.

Not swinging and missing at pitches over the plate has helped. He’s probably still leaking and reaching over the plate a bit too much, but at least the empty flails haven’t been as prevalent.”

Full article: SB Nation

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Tommy Hunter making Phillies fans nervous

Rafe Anderson

The struggles of Phillies pitcher Tommy Hunter stem in part from more hittable pitches, as his heatmaps show in this SB Nation article…

“Take a look at the heat maps for Hunter from 2017 and 2018. You can see that in 2018, there is a noticeable amount of pitches that are located in more hittable places the hitting zone than there were last year. In 2017, you see that the red is showing up more often below the belt and down against righties, whereas this year, there is more in the middle and up. Seeing pitches in those places helps jive with the numbers that hitters are producing against Hunter.”

Full article: SB Nation

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Rhys Hoskins struggles versus changeup

Rafe Anderson

On SB Nation's Phillies blog, Paul Boyé looks at Rhys Hoskins' struggles against the changeup.

"Entering Saturday afternoon’s game, Hoskins had seen exactly 100 changeups in all counts, according to TruMedia. ...

In 2-1 counts, Hoskins is being baited. He’s waiting for a fastball, and instead he’s getting the string pulled on him fairly frequently. And when that string gets pulled, well, you see what’s been happening.

Now, that’s not an AB-ender. A 2-1 whiff gives you another shot, and Hoskins has been more than capable of handling himself in two-strike counts. Lately, though, the changeup has been used with incredible effectiveness against him in those two-strike counts."

Full article: SB Nation

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Gerrit Cole's changing strategy

Rafe Anderson

ESPN's David Schoenfeld uses TruMedia imagery to show how Gerrit Cole's fastball location has changed this season.

"Cole was solid across the board in 2017, with a high home run rate leading to a 4.26 ERA. The increase in strikeout rate and swing-and-miss rate is phenomenal -- and note that his ground ball rate has plummeted.

As you might expect, and as others have reported, it’s a change in philosophy. The Pirates like two-seamers and ground balls; the Astros like four-seamers and strikeouts. You can see the difference in Cole's fastball location."

Full article: ESPN.com

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Strikeouts continue to rise

Rafe Anderson

The Washington Post's Neil Greenberg uses TruMedia's platform and imagery to explore how and why MLB's strikeout rate continues to rise.

"A decade ago, the first year data is available, less than 75 percent of pitches in the strike zone were called strikes, but that has since improved to 85 percent in 2017 and more than 86 percent this season. Plus, pitchers are inducing more swinging strikes (10.7 percent vs. 8.7 percent in 2008) than ever before."

Full article: Washington Post

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Nola Pitching to (Bad) Contact

Rafe Anderson

On SB Nation's Phillies blog, Paul Boyé uses TruMedia's platform and graphics to show how Aaron Nola is succeeding by pitching to bad contact.

"Let’s start with the recently resurgent changeup, which Nola threw a career-high-matching 28 times Friday. He’s thrown 104 of them on the year now, and given up exactly five hits.

The above TruMedia heatmaps represent Nola’s changeup locations and SLG allowed, respectively. He’s locating it exceptionally well, and hitters are doing squat with it. The spots are in line with how he’s normally located the pitch, but he’s hung fewer over the heart of the plate and, as a result, been victimized less. That’s usually a pretty good recipe for success, and the contact rates bear that out so far."

Full article: SB Nation

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